Fujifilm X20: first impressions

Categoria: English Pubblicato: Giovedì, 18 Aprile 2013 Scritto da Donato Chirulli

 

The brand new 12 MegaPixels “X-trans” sensor, the new Hybrid Autofocus System, the focus peaking and, last but not least, the informations shown in the viewfinder, lead the new X20 to a level that probably no other compact camera has ever reached.  In this moment I’m in the verge to leave to realize a reportage that will allow to deeply test all the new features Fuji put inside this new X20, but I didn’t lose the possibility to shoot some pictures to test how the camera works in the field. Based on what I’ve seen until now, we can say that promises have been kept.

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 250 - Focal lenght 28 mm - Spot Metering - Aperture priority - f/3,6 1/40 sec. - File Raf converted with LR 4.4 C.R. - Levels and brightness adjustments via PS

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 500 - Focal lenght 7mm - Spot metering - Aperture Priority - f/2,0 1/40 sec. - File Raf converted with LR 4.4 C.R. - Levels and brightness adjustments via PS

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 500 - Focale 10 mm - Misurazione Spot - Priorità Diaframmi - f/2,2 1/80 sec. - File Jpeg OOC

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 500 - Focal lenght 10 mm - Spot metering - Aperture priority - f/2,2 1/80 sec. - File Jpeg OOC


My very first shots were taken at night, and I easily recognized the improvements to the AF, thanks to the new Hybrid Af System. Responsiveness and accuracy are far better than any other previous X series camera, even in very low light situations.This improvement alone should justify the release of this new model for people that, like me, prefer enthusiast compact cameras or CSC cameras over the heavy and bulky DSLR.
The historical major weakness of such cameras has always been the sluggish and unaccurate AF performances, basically due to the lack of mirror-based technologies. Regarding the high ISO perfomances, few shots are not enough to give a definitive verdict but the new X-trans sensor’s preformances seem to be an improvement over the previous X10.


Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 100 - Focal lenght 8 mm - Spot Metering - Aperture Priority - f/11 1/350 sec. - File Raf converted with LR 4.4 C.R. - Levels and brightness adjustments via PS

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 100 - Focal lenght 7 mm - Multi metering - Aperture Priority - f/7,1 1/105 sec. - File Jpeg OOC

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 100 - Focal lenght 13 mm - Spot metering - Aperture Priority - f/8,0 1/140 sec. - File Raf converted with LR 4.4 C.R.

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 125 - Focal lenght 10 mm - Multi metering - Aperture priority - f/2,2 1/40 sec. - Macro - File Raf converted with LR 4.4 C.R.

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 100 - Focal lenght 28 mm - Multi metering - Aperture Priority - f/8,0 1/140 sec. - +1,7 EV - File Raf converted with LR 4.4 C.R.

Above you can see different pictures coming from RAW or JPeg OOC. In this regard we must inform that the last Silkypix RAW file converter, in its last windows version 3.2.13.0 downloaded just two days ago (at the time of the original review), can’t open X20’s RAF files. Thus we had to use Lightroom 4.4 Candidate Release.

The pictures haven’t been particularly treated, except where specifically indicated. For the Jpeg OOC all the parameters were set to zero, with Standard film simulation and DR 100. Please note how the focusing on the cat, in the picture above, was precise even with difficult lighting conditions and a dark subject in the darkest area of the frame.  In the picture below you can see the same shot, as a straight RAW conversion (the first one) and as a Jpeg OOC (the second one), followed by two 100% crop.

Fuji X20 - Iso(Auto) 100 - Focale 28 mm - Multi Metering - Aperture priority - f/5,6 1/180 sec - Please note how the Jpeg, even with all parameters set to zero, applies a bit of sharpening and saturation compared to the RAW file. In both cases there’s no traces of artifacts or chromatic abberation


Finally, we would like to point out a very useful feature to set the automatic ISO: we can now desice a standard setting to be used whenever it’s possible and, at the same time, a minimum shutter speed